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20120701
20120731
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: a 12-year veteran with the baltimore city fire department, simmons was arrested monday. wjz has learned he had been arrested for human trafficking and prostitution back in 2010 but was never charged. >> as of this moment, he has been suspended without bay -- pay. and we will begin our preliminary investigation into this situation. >> reporter: police also seized several computers, flash drives, condoms, and sex toys, from inside the warehouse. ian knoll runs a business on the ground floor. >> i never thought for a second that anything of this type of magnitude would be taking place. not here. >> reporter: 33-year-old franklin coit, a convicted felon, is also charged with running a prostitution ring and after-hours club. he, too, was arrested for the same charges in 2010. >> reporter: we've learned that simmons has been taken to central booking. he faces a number of state charges before the federal charges. and those in themselves include human trafficking, gun charges and of course those prostitution charges. live at city police headquarters, i'm jessica kartalija, wjz eyewitness news.
in baltimore county. five of them have been in baltimore city. many of the victims have had underlying heart problems. and it certainly underscores how dangerous this heat can be. >> reporter: the death toll keeps rising across maryland, during one of the longest stretches of temperatures above 95 degrees in state history. and those who have to work outside are doing their best to stay hydrated and safe. >> it can get pretty hectic. have to drink a lot of fluids. have to keep you balanced. >> it's very, very bad. but we work because i need money. i need to pay the bills. i need --ue know. -- you know. we need work. >> reporter: most of the deaths have been in baltimore city, men, over 65, with heart problems. but no one is immune from the danger. >> the longer this goes on, as people become sort of used to it, they may lose sight of the fact that it continues to be a real hazard. >> we want to avoid any deaths at all. and if people stay cool and hydrated, we can avoid those negative outcomes. >> he's the biggest problem. pavement gets really hot. i try to keep really short walks. >> reporter
. it is trees on top of electrical wires that still dot the landscape in baltimore county, baltimore city, and several other maryland counties. 3,000 workers from bge and other states are going to hard- hit neighborhoods, trying to repair the damage and get the lights back on. sky eye chopper 13 is over crews in parkville, where you can see damage to at least one home there. wjz is live with first warning weather coverage. we'll check in with captain jeff long in sky eye chopper 13. but first, mike hellgren is in baltimore county, with updated information on repairs. mike? >> reporter: mary, unfortunately, this scene, this long after the storm, is still what it looks like in many neighborhoods. a lot of big, downed trees. you can see what the lightning and wind did to this one. this is one of those neighborhoods that is still without power. the governor says he are entering a very dangerous phase right now, because so many people have been without electricity for so long. about 150,000 bge customers are now out. and that's about 150,000 too many. >> reporter: this is new, amateur video, s
. most of the outages were in baltimore city and baltimore county. >> reporter: finally, relief from the heat, after more than a week of sweltering temperatures that killed at least 13 people in maryland and more than 45 nationwide. it buckled train tracks and roads. even softened pavement enough to get this jet stuck. >> does she wear glasses or contacts? >> and there could be more deaths, as final numbers are tallied and official reports are coming in from the medical examiner. the hot air fueled storms that left more than 7,000 people without power last week. and more storms last night, knocked out power again to hundreds after bge just finished restoration efforts. the utility will file a report with the public service commission, which regulates it, within three weeks about their response. and the psc will hold hearings over whether it was appropriate. many won't soon forget those stifling temperatures. >> i'm really glad that there's air conditioning. >> a lot of people are sick of it. >> it is for now. but summer is only just beginning. >> reporter: construction work continues
remains in the cecil county jail on the $200,000 bond. >>> baltimore city fire chief jim clack makes the decision regarding his controversial pay raise. his new contract gives him an 18% salary jump by 2018. the move has caused an uproar in the fire union since it comes as some firecompanies are being closed. today, chief clack says that firefighters do not get their pay raise, he will donate his to the city fire department's fire foundation. >>> well, we are enjoying another day of beautiful weather. lots of sunshine, with some scattered clouds. not too hot out there. just really perfect. meteorologist tim williams is updating our first warning conditions. >> >> we are looking at high pressure solidly in control in our forecast. but we have rain not too far from the south. but what that means is that clouds have been cast in our direction as a result of all of that shower activity and storms. all along that stationary front. that front was our friend. it's the front that changed all of our dynamics from the 100- degree temperatures a week ago. but it stalled to the south. clouds and
decades on the baltimore city police force. but now an officer is forced to resign in disgrace. mary is in the newsroom with more on this case. >> reporter: the detective and her daughter both pleaded guilty today to theft. police sayanderson undercharged her mother. as she brought groceries at this food depot. a security officer spotted what was going on and alerted managers. today, early received probation judgment. early must serve three months probation. >>> anderson received six months supervised probation. air a woman who injected potentially deadly substances. wjz is live in federal court. mike hellgren with more on the sentence and reaction to it. mike? >> vic, she says she was just trying to feed her family and told the judge she accepted responsibility. in addition to those three years, she get a $25,000 fine, far less than the $2 fifty,000 fine the government wanted. can't say anything. >> she said she was just trying to get people to feel better about themselves. never realizing the danger. federal prosecutors say it was industrial grade. the kind used in paint and furnit
of his car, skidded out of control and died. police say speeding is to blame. >>> grading baltimore city schools. new numbers show a slight improvement in education. but there is still a long way to go. wjz is live. rochelle ritchie is at city school headquarters in east baltimore with the results. rochelle? >> reporter: well, denise, the results are mixed and show the challenges ahead. >> reporter: superintendent dr. andres alonzo reveals the results for the 2012 assessment test. the results not wad but -- not bad but not good. >> reporter: the numbers matter. and they matter tremendously. >> reporter: baltimore city school's numbers remain fairly dorm ant to last year. math scores in grades 3 through 8 are up two percentage points in 2011, where 62% of students scored a proficient or advanced. this year, an increase of just 63%. >> summer school last year was all about math. because we knew that math was the subject that we needed to make the progress. >> reporter: focusing solely on math. the scores for reading was decreased nearly 2% from 69% to just under 68%. >> for new entrants in
. >>> had is wjztv and wjz.com. baltimore. >> from the cities, the countys to your neighborhood. now, it is complete coverage. it is wjz. maryland's news station. >>> getting bigger. a sinkhole downtown widens. >> how it is effecting businesses and residences. >> i am jessica kartalija. >> i am don scott. >> here is what people are talking . >> it could take nine days to stabilize that sinkhole that is effecting businesses and homes on east monument street. we break down the growing problem and what is done to fix it? good afternoon, mike. >> reporter: good afternoon, jessica. adafternoon, everybody. it looks significantly different. there is more heavy equipment here. some of the damage is so bad people could temporarily lose water. a big sinkhole is getting bigger. it opened last week shutting down monument street near john hopkins hospital. the cause is a cult vet that collapsed. public works officials are concerned that sanitation collection lines may have been compromised. water was suspended to some buildings in the block of east monument street. >> this is the aging infra
,000 without service. in baltimore county, more than 32,000 have no power. baltimore city, it's just under 20,000. and howard county has 4700 customers still without service. in all right now, 77,000 homes and businesses still need to have their service restored. maryland's heat wave continues right now. a heat advisory is in effect for most of the state. outside, it's sunny and hot. and for the eighth day in a row, the temperature is over 90 degrees. first warning weather coverage continues with bob turk, who is updating these pleasant conditions. >> unfortunately, i don't see a lot of that break coming until maybe next week. we have a break in the thunderstorms now. it's very quiet. just a few things up near west virginia. but we do expect to see things beginning to pop this afternoon. a few things showing up. not much to look at at this point. but i am concerned with all of this heat and energy in the atmosphere, we could see some widely scattered, severe thunderstorms tonight. probably between 5:00 and 9:00. most should be over by then. but there's certainly a possibility of some isolated
of the deaths have been in baltimore city. five of them. and there have been about 60 heat-related emergency room visits every day throughout the state. >> reporter: even before the sun came up, it was a hot one. one of the longest stretches in maryland history, of temperatures above 95 degrees. for some, if you can't beat the heat, go full-bore into the sun. >> i'm not a big hot weather person. but you wouldn't be able to talk with me here dripping in sweat in the sun. >> it's irritating. >> reporter: for others it was time to hit the shade. the temperatures are rising. most of those who have died are men older than 65 who live in baltimore. >> people who have chronic illness, particularly heart problems, they do worse with the heat. and they do worse with every day of the heat. so you can see increasing problems and increasing deaths as the heat wave goes on. >> avoid alcohol. keep hydrated. and monitor yourself. monitor your body. but we can survive this well if we take the necessary precautions. >> i can't move any slower than what i'm already moving. [ laughter ] >> i find that i have n
-year veteran of the baltimore city fire department. he is now suspended without pay, pending an internal investigation. vic? >> mary, thank you. simmons was a firefighter with truck 25 out of rowland park. >> controversy continues out of plans to give fire chief james clack a contract extension and a pay raise. comes at a time when fire companies are being closed. >> derek valcourt explains, a vote on the measure was taken today, as more opponents speak out. derek? >> well, the mayor says the fire chief has earned that pay raise. but firefighters and some city residents say the fire chief is benefiting from their loss. >> reporter: the permanent closure of three city fire companies because of three budget constraints already had firefighters angry. which is why the mayor's request had firefighters union leaders saying no way. >> this [ inaudible ] i don't think chief complak or his command staff should take the raise. >> reporter: but in a 3-2 vote, the city board of estimates agrees to extend the contract for six years. the deal grants clack more than $28,000 worth of pay in
on the trail. >> he was located hiding inside of an abandoned home. >> reporter: in baltimore city, officers tried to stop watson after he sideswiped a car and kept going. police followed him and on 97 south toward anne arundel county. baltimore police called their their pursuit and called anne arundel county. he drove every ratically on the interstate and you can see he came close to hitting several cars on the road. >> it's a dangerous situation, not just in our county but other areas with the way he was driving. >> reporter: speeding through residential neighborhood and hopes to make a left turn but smashes into a sedan, the driver left stunned. >> justice prevailed, you know? >> reporter: charged for drug possession after 11 violations just yesterday. >> any related charges. >> reporter: police say the vehicle watson was driving at the time was not stolen. and tonight, watson remains in jail. kai, back to you. >> rochelle, thank you. watson is expected to face charges in baltimore city as well. >>> maryland lost 11,000 jobs in june according to the u.s. department of labor. that makes th
news sunday morning starts now. >> this is wjz tv, wjz hd, and wjz.com. baltimore. >> from the city to the counties to your neighborhood. now is complete coverage. it's wjz, maryland's new station. >> in the dark, thousands of homes without power still as people brace for another day of high heat. the latest. >> welcome to eyewitness news this sunday. i'm gigi barnett. hundreds of thousands of people waiting for the power to cut back on after this weekend's deadly storm sends trees crashing to the ground and cutting power lines. now there is widespread damage. one of those trees on this homecoming is 71-year-old woman inside. in southern anne arundel county, a man died when a tree crashed through his car he was driving at the time. the roof blew right off this apartment building. a total of 800 people have been displaced. roofers are working to make sure they can return home but it will take weeks before those repairs are complete. the wjz has complete coverage of this monstrous storm and the statewide cleanup. meteorologist to williams at the first warning weather center monitoring
- related deaths. >> reporter: already, maryland has seen four deaths from the heat. two from baltimore city, one in montgomery county, another in wicomico county. doctors say those at risk have underlying health problems. >> they do worse with the heat. and they do worse with every day of the heat. you can see increasing problems and increasing deaths as the heat wave goes on. >> reporter: but it's so hot, even healthy adults are in trouble. >> i've gotten dizzy. so i decided to carry an umbrella today. because the heat just pounds on you. and it's excruciating. >> i got business, i take care of it in the morning. so when it's starting to get real hot, i'm heading towards home. >> i'm not young myself. so it's pretty hard on all of us. >> reporter: howard monet already opens his air- conditioned home to friends and family. and with power still out for tens of thousands, health officials are hoping others will do the same and keep the sun from taking lives. >> hospital emergency rooms also feeling the heat. many have noticed an uptick in the number of people over the age of 65, who are comin
-- this is not a one state problem. this is a national problem. >> baltimore's city crumbling system supplies the entire region. >> even with water rates going up 9% and $300 million in replacement pipe going on in the next 5 years many fear it's not enough to keep up with the ageing system. >> the senator wants a federal trust fund. >> there's an ongoing degregs of these systems and it's putting our human health at risk. >> a temp raur -- temporary water system finally allowed businesses to reopen. >> they need to fix them, repair them and replace them. other wise, this is going to happen a lot. using high-tech equipment this was a bigger main that was discovered about to crack prompting people to conserve water while it's fixed. >> if we can make repairs and replacement prior to an emergency arises that's always the best approach. >> many wonder when and where will the next emergency strike. >> reporter: regarding the continuing work here downtown, i asked if they were sticking to their 3 week estimate and they said yes but it's like when you go to the mechanic with the car and get under th
at the updated numbers. baltimore county still has it the worst with nearly 20,000 out. baltimore city, howard county and anne arundel county are also hit hard. in total, about 44,000 bge customers are without power right now. >> well, here's more frustrating news for those in the dark. this heat is growing more intense. emergency rooms are starting to fill up with patients who are dehydrated or worse. monique griego has late word on moredeaths linked to this receipt heat wave. >> reporter: another day under a vicious sun, as triple-digit temperatures bear down on baltimore. >> the humidity has made it unbearable. doesn't matter if you're in the shade or in the sun. >> i'm sweating water now. i feel like a walking river right now. >> reporter: people sweating it out in the city, try to refuel, create their own shade, or simply ditch a few layers in an effort to stay cool. >> it's horrible. hot and sweaty is not a good feeling. >> on the way to keep cool. umbrella, fans and water. >> reporter: but when it's in hot, the weather isn't just uncomfortable. it can be dangerous. >> we definitely see
in maryland, baltimore city reporting more than any other city. >> so the danger is day after day after day of high heat, the most vulnerable of us in the community are even more vulnerable. so that includes the elderly folks with underlying heart conditions. it's critical for them to be in cool spaces. >> reporter: hydration is the key to survival for anyone working outdoors. >> you can actually fry an egg on the roof. >> reporter: roofs baking in the sun can reach temperatures of 180 degrees. part of why roofers often altser their schedules. start early in the morning and try to get off at 2:00 before the heat sets in. drink a lott of water and gate -- a lot of water and gatorade. >> reporter: for chimney repairmen, that means take a lot of breaks. >> he mr. come down and i from -- he will come down and i will go up. take breaks. it helps a lot. >> i get a slurpee when i have to to go sit in my car until it cools down. that's the only way i survive. >> reporter: city pools are open an extra hour today because of this code red heat alert. in fact, the city has open 11 different cooling sta
. >> reporter: most of the deaths have have been in baltimore city. older men, with heart problems. but no one is immune. >> people may lose sight of the fact that it continues to be a real hazard. >> we want to avoid any deaths at all. and if people stay cool and hydrated, we can avoid those negative outcomes. >> heat is a big problem. try to take the dog out. and the pavement gets really hot. try to keep really short walks. >> reporter: some are enjoying being outside in the hazy sunshine. >> to me, laying out in the sun is ther putic. and -- therapeutic and clears my mind and thoughts. when you can't afford tanning, you improvise. >> i saw the temperature tomorrow. and i thought, how far away can i get if i start driving now? [ laughter ] >> reporter: and the state has activated its emergency heat plan. right now, there is an emergency meeting of the city council to discuss the response to this heat wave. reporting live in hampden, mike hellgren, week eyewitness news. >> mike -- wjz eyewitness news. >> mike, thank you. bge and thousands of out-of- town crews continue to work to get people b
of which have been in baltimore city. and that danger is why doctors are telling people to stay out of the sun or find a cool place to cool off. >> reporter: another day under a vicious sun, as triple digit temperatures bear down on baltimore. >> the humidity has made it unbearable. doesn't matter if you're in the shade or in the sun. >> i'm sweating water now. i feel like a walking river right now. >> reporter: people sweating it out in the city. try to refuel. create their own shade, or simply ditch a few layers in an effort to stay cool. >> it's horrible. because it's so hot and sweaty. and it's just the noad -- not a good feeling. >> keeping cool with umbrella, water. >> reporter: but when it's this hot, the weather isn't just uncomfortable, it can also be dangerous. >> we definitely see a lot more people coming in who are dehydrated. they're not anticipating it. >> reporter: dr. michael witting works in the e.r.a. the -- e.r., the maryland medical center. he says people come in dehydrated, confused and weak. but it can get worse. >> the heat has been blamed for eight deaths in
in baltimore city. we have road closures due to the massive water main break. let's take a live look. as you can see, there is the vehicle fire at wilkins avenue if you look to the right side of your screen. for the most accurate and up to date information, count on us at wjz.com. >>> here is what people are talking about. shock waves from the ncaa penalties against penn state. the effects being felt not only at the campus but around the country this morning. sports director mark vive -- mark viviano has more. >>> reporter: good morning, the sanctions are steep and they include a $60 million fine, equal to one year of penn state's revenue, a rich program with a rich tradition finds itself on the brink of busted. in addition to the fine, a four- year ban on bowl games and a reduction in scholarships likely to cripple a once strong program. their proud past forever tarnished. penn state's present and future in doubt. the ncaa stopped short of shutting down the program, instead handing down wide ranging and long lasting punishment in reaction to the cover up of a sex scandal involving jerry san
and another 47,000 out in baltimore city and about 30,000 customers still do not have customers. in all 159,000 crews are waiting for power to be restored. our complete coverage continues with jeff long live in our chopper in baltimore county. how's it look? >> reporter: well, it looks like we have a lot of crews working down here. this is in the idolwood community and just in this neighborhood alone we've seen about five different crews working to repair the damaged lines and a lot of tree damage in this area. this is one of the areas that has one of the larger concentrations of power outages. we'll stick around to see what happens. reporting live, i'm captain jeff long. >> thank you. utility companies are struggling to get the lights and air conditioning back on for hundreds of thousands from the midwest to mid-atlantic. for some it's taking too long. danielle has the latest from hard hit arlington, virginia. >> reporter: there is growing frustration over how quickly utility companies are restoring electricity in washington d.c. and its suburbs. in maryland, power lines are still lying in
-hd and wjz.com, baltimore. from the city to the counties to your neighborhood, now is complete coverage. it's wjz, maryland's news station. >> it is 4:30. 74 degrees with light rain in the area. hello. thank you for staying with wjz eyewitness news. i'm denise koch. >> i'm vic carter. here's what people are talking about. >> dozens of men, women and children are dead, dying or injured. sarah reports from aurora. >> there's hundreds of people there around. >> reporter: chaos and panic following a shooting at a midnight showing of the dark knight rises. a man propped open an exit door at this aurora, colorado, cinema and threw in a smoke canister. >> anytime anyone would get up, he would shoot them. no specific agenda. >> reporter: he's 24-year-old james holmes. they evacuated his apartment complex after the suspect allegedly made comments about explosives. >> our investigation determined that his apartment is booby trapped with apparent trip wires. it may be hours or days. >> reporter: the investigation into the crime continues with the community rallying together. >> we've taken a blow toda
apart the asphalt. >> this is the nature of the aging infrastructure in many large cities. baltimore is not an exception. >> reporter: a water main break two weeks ago. and yesterday, a 20-feet deep, 2-feet wide, and 6 feet long sinkhole, opening into a storm drain built into the 1930s. >> right now, we are sending a crew in to do a walk-in inspection of the large storm drain under the street. >> reporter: sky eye chopper 13 over the scene, showing a gaping hole in the middle of the street. causing confusion amongst pedestrians navigating their way on closed roads. >> just a little -- a few customers coming in. >> reporter: the city says it is taking the necessary measures to find and fix the problems. so far, crews have used a camera underground to look at the engage -- damage. scan water mains and check the sewer drains to make sure they're intact. >> it will give us an indication of what needs to be done in order to make a correction. >> reporter: but some say that correction will be just another temporary fix for a permanent problem. >> they need another system. >> i don't see wh
to the city as part of a settlement. baltimore sued wells fargo accusing sub prime lending practices targeting minority neighborhoods. baltimore will get $7.5 million for lending assistance programs. the settlement includes restitution for effected city residents. >>> a plane full of passengers looks on at bwi as two flight attendants are rushed from the tarmac to the hospital. as kai jackson explains, hazmat crews were brought in to search the plane. >> sky chopper 13 is high above bwi airport after southwest airlines flight 709 made its scheduled landing with an emergency on board. >> the airplane is parked at gait a-1. >> the flight originated in virginia. authorities say at some point in the air a flight attendant became sick. once the plane landed it was determined a second flight attendant was also ill, both complaining of nausea. >> authorities say after the flight landed at bwi the two stick flight attendants were taken to the hospital and a has malt team with the ann arundel county fire department inspected the plane. >> they did air samples to see what would have been the cause. they
zero in new york city. that is a total of 641 miles. we caught up with them in baltimore today, as they ran through our city. the run will raise money for the wiewrnded warrior project that helps-- wounded warrior project that helps raise money for injured servicemen. >> good luck to them. >> semper fi. >>> still ahead. missing from capitol hill. what is keeping congressman jesse jackson, jr., from work. and what his father is saying today. >>> fierce flooding and rain fills up texas and one roadside rescue. >>> i remember wanting to get there. >> the victim turns into the rescuer. how an injured surgeon's quick thinking helped save a paramedic's life. >>> it is a mild summer afternoon. but could the heat be getting cranked back up? well, tim hinted at it. stay with us. your updated first warning weather forecast is coming up. ,,,, hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>> it's partly cloudy. 85 degrees in central maryland right now. the complet
: and they are making progress. the most outages right now are in baltimore county, followed by the city and anne arundel county. more than 7500 lines were reported down, from that storm on friday. reporting live, mike hellgren, wjz eyewitness news. >> okay, mike. thank you. >>> and our first warning weather coverage continues now with rochelle ritchie, who has more on the impact in cecil county. >> reporter: well, vic, the family is still waiting to see if their home can be saved. the evidence of their near death experience, still lies in their yard. >> reporter: he's only 6 years old. but benny dixon knows all too well the sound of fear. >> you can see how that was a big mess. >> reporter: dixon was seen friday night, when his parents burst into his room. snatching him and his little sister out of their bed. >> daddy said we had to go to another safe place. and we did. we went to the bathroom closet. >> reporter: his parents could hear the howling winds winds and winds and crackling trees. what happened next nearly killed them. >> my husband knew right away, a tree went through the house. >> re
. >>> a frightening problem on a major baltimore street. a growing sinkhole. hits another problem for the city's old infrastructure. wjz is live right now. mike hellgren takes a closer look at the solutions to this growing problem. mike? >> reporter: vic, it's going to take sometime before this street gets back to normal. normally, it would be filled with cars, but it's just a mess right now. and they brought in heavy equipment to try to fix the hole. >> reporter: from sky eye chopper 13, you can see how much the monument street sinkhole has expanded. on the left is what it looks like now. on the right is just after it opens last week. it's still not stable. so dangerous, crews can't imagine the exact size. >> it's quite a challenge for us to come up with a design. especially with the roadway. >> reporter: the sink hole is just blocks from johns hopkins hospital. this busy part of monument street between bradford and east monford streets will be closed for weeks. >> reporter: dpw brought in ground-penetrating radar to test other areas around the sinkhole and found no problem. but for many, it's stil
in baltimore city. >> like the others, they follow the same pattern. they tend to be older. all of them are over the age of 45. they're distributed around the state. >> reporter: the elderly and those with preexisting medical conditions are most vulnerable. and that message is getting out. >> if you do have somebody elderly in your family, you do need to check on them. especially if they don't have air conditioning. >> reporter: one step that could prevent the death toll from rising as we head into august. maryland has issued 12 heat advisories this summer already. meghan mccorkell, wjz eyewitness news. >> the city opened several cooling centers throughout the day today. and extended hours at public pools. remember, wjz 13 is always on. check in for first warning weather coverage. for updates on the forecast, live doppler radar any time, log onto wjz.com. >>> well, fresh off harsh criticism from their dur etcho storm response, bge is seeking rate increases. if approved by the public service commission, the transmission portion of your bill would increase by about 6.6%. gas transmission
september the 4th. >>> baltimore city department of public works is urging people to begin conserving water due to a po even if shallly dangerous water main. it runs under the tracks in southwest baltimore and carries the water to anne arundel and howard counties. using a robot, serious rust damage was spotted inside the pipe. further testing will begin in a few hours. it comes from northwest baltimore. and today the four people charged in the videotape beating of a tourist have pled guilty in the attack. two pled guilty to robbery. two others pled guilty to second-degree assault. parsons was sentenced to one year in jail. carter and davis were seven tenned -- sentenced to time served. >>> a big money deal for the preakness winner i will have another. he has been sold for $10 million. the owner says he sold the ber di and preakness winner to a horse farm in japan. i will have another was retired with a tendon injury before he had a chance to run at belmont and perhaps take the triple crown. crown. now he will be a stud on a ,,,,, beep-bop-boop-bop boop-beep. [monotone] she says, "switch to
. >> reporter: like the fire department, baltimore city police are also working on a social media policy. they say no specific problems issue are behind that push. >> and both the police and fire departments are looking at what department negligence are the cities have done. as well as professional organizations to develop their new guidelines. reporting live downtown, mike hellgren, wjz eyewitness news. >> all right. thank you, mike. the department has no official deadline to put the social media policies into effect. >>> maryland firefighters rescue a dozen people. take a look at the scene. 17 people were trapped by the flame. and quickly rescued by firefighters. eventuallily, the fire went to three alarms. no one was injured. the fire caused $1.5 million in damage. >>> a new law trying to catch up to technology and the danger it poses on the road. maryland, it's now illegal to text while driving. alex demetrick reports, police are starting to enforce it. >> it's day one for a new patrol in anne arundel county. in a half dozen marked and unmarked units. the new target? >> trying to fin
a chance to experience restaurants that they may not normally go to. check out new things in the city. >> reporter: baltimore's restaurant week continues for 10 days and includings two weekends. so make your reservations early. >> it's a wonderful opportunity for us. we know that during restaurant week, a lot of customers we see are new faces. and that's a great opportunity for us to do what we do best. >> reporter: ron matz, wjz eyewitness news. >> and we'll do what we do best as customers, and that's eat. this is baltimore's seventh summer restaurant week. for a complete list of participating restaurants, log onto our website, wjz.com, and click on news. >>> coming up on eyewitness news at 4:00. >> take a deep breath. >> electronic tlc. see the latest in doctor care that may be coming to a hospital near you. >>> a petri dish of germs. where bwi falls in a survey of disease-spreading airports. >>> and it's a sticky afternoon. bob has the latest on the heat advisory in his first warning forecast. wjz 13 is always on. for the top stores on wjz -- stories on wjz.com, instant [ barks ] [
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31